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        The most popular festival in Ratchaburi is Dammoen Saduak Floating Market & Sweet Grape Week Fair in every year in March. This area is known for famous floating market that comes alive with a fair featuring some typical and unusual activities. These include a Thai cooking competition, a “sea-boxing” competition, boating competition, as well as local product sales including fruits and Thai sweets and agricultural exhibitions.

         Ratchaburi is a land of rich and varied culture and origin, much of which has been preserved and can still be seen today. Amongst the things of interest are the histories, the way of life, the culture, and the natural beautiful including caves, streams, forests and mountains. That’s why Ratchaburi is still a popular place in Thailand.

Ratchaburi Tourism Fair (งานเที่ยวราชบุรี) is held every year during February–March on the ground of the City Hall. Activities include demonstrations of famous handicrafts, such as jar making and “Sin Tin Chok” cloth weaving, the selling of OTOP products and agricultural produce, and folk art and cultural performances by local tribal groups.

Sweet Grape and Damnoen Saduak Floating Market Week Fair (งานเทศกาลองุ่นหวานและตลาดน้ำดำเนินสะดวก) is held around March–April of every year to introduce agricultural produce to the market, especially grapes which most people grow in Amphoe Damnoen Saduak. Damnoen Saduak Grape is famous for its sweetness and good taste. This fair features the beauty contest of Thida A-ngun Wan and the competition of quality agricultural products.

Khao Ho or ‘Ang Mi Thong’ Festival (ประเพณีกินข้าวห่อ หรือ อั๊งหมี่ทอง) is a Su Khwan ceremony or the blessing ceremony for happiness and longevity in life, held around the ninth lunar month. Karens believe that the ninth lunar month is a bad time when ghosts and evil hunt and eat “Khwan”(spirit) of people, so those people may get sick or die. Normally, this ceremony is often held on the full moon day of the ninth lunar month, but if some families are not convenient, they can change to any day in the ninth month. In the ceremony, people boil “Khao Ho” which is sticky rice moulded and wrapped in a cone shape; then they will boil it like Khanom Chang. In the past, they ate Khao Ho by dipping it in honey but at present they often dip it in sliced coconut. On the day they boil Khao Ho, the Su Khwan Ceremony will be held, too. It starts with poking a wooden plate and blowing a Khaen for entertainment; then the elders in each family will tie red threads on the children’s wrists and give a blessing for good luck.

 

   
For more information and reservations
Please contact Pakdee Chiemchanya 081-8137713 or Kraivut Vongsurakrai 081-6427295
Email : asajararesort@gmail.com  Line ID : asajara
99 Moo 10 Ban Kha Ratchaburi, Thailand.
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